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We went from 4 men on a truck to 2 men, and did twice as much work.

Sir, I began my spray foam career in June of 2001.  I was hired as a helper, and worked my...
2011-02-11T01:42:25+00:00
Sir, I began my spray foam career in June of 2001.  I was hired as a helper, and worked my way up to a certified spray foam applicator and crew leader.  We were located in South Florida, and for 10 months out of the year the heat in the attics was terrible.  We were constantly exhausted, suffered near heat strokes, and could spray maybe 20 to 30 minutes at a time, and then exit the spray area to rest.  We rotated 3 to 4 sprayers in order to get jobs done.   We were introduced to a Chill Box in 2001, an air-conditioned system that moved air through 300' of air line to our hoods.  At times the Florida attics were 140 to 150 degrees, yet we had cool air in our hoods.  We stopped using the small air compressors like Bullard, the freeze vests, ice chests, and just used the Chill Boxes.  In just a few weeks, we were able to spray almost twice as much foam, and we made a lot more money.  We could stay in the hot attics for hours.  During the hot summer months, we were the only company working, doing everyone's retro work.  Other sprayers tried to come to work for us.  We went from 4 men on a truck to 2 men, and did twice as much work.   You can call me to ask any questions. Mat Frauuenhofer (239) 503-5103

Sounds like you got a winner!

Sounds like you got a winner, Mike.  BASF as you know has a lot of contractor contacts.  If you have...
2014-03-14T01:41:05+00:00
Sounds like you got a winner, Mike.  BASF as you know has a lot of contractor contacts.  If you have pricing, sales sheets or other information, we would be glad to get it out to our sales force so they can promote your product to our customers.   I have been active with the EPA, NIOSH, OSHA and other govt. agencies over the last couple years working on the guidelines now posted on www.spraypolyurethane.org.  Your "invention" fits right in for worker safety and protection. Regards, "Jim" James Anderson Manager Applications and Training SPF Systems  

Tennessee Chill Box AKA the Life Saver

If anyone is wondering if their fresh air supply is really working... then you need another one.  I spent 5...
2014-03-14T01:41:28+00:00
If anyone is wondering if their fresh air supply is really working... then you need another one.  I spent 5 years in ridiculously hot FL attics with the typical Allegro scuba type facemask blowing me a measly 6 cfm's of blow dryer air. Technically I should be dead, but I survived long enough to experience what I dreamed of for years...the Chill Box.  We have the smaller unit and it actually blows too much cold air, so we tone it down of course with the variable speed blower.  There is simply no comparison and I don't know how I insulated without it.  Any questions you can find me at centralfloridasprayfoam.com Christopher Paoli - (407) 709-0913 ~ Central Florida

We have purchased 5 Chill Box Units, and we will continue to buy these Units.

We have purchased 5 Chill box Units, and we will continue to buy these Units.  It has solved the problem...
2014-03-14T01:41:55+00:00
We have purchased 5 Chill box Units, and we will continue to buy these Units.  It has solved the problem of ensuring that our employees are safe and comfortable while performing their tasks Terence Hynes - Banker Insulation ~ Arizona

Tennessee Chill Box is the BEST!

I have been an evaluator of services for over 4 decades and I am proud to announce that out of...

Bill: Garland, TX
469-441-6488

5.0
2015-10-18T14:55:19+00:00

Bill: Garland, TX
469-441-6488

I have been an evaluator of services for over 4 decades and I am proud to announce that out of a decent number of satisfactory services that I have received, Tennessee Chill Box undeniably provides the Best, Most Satisfactory, Product and Service available. Bridget and I along with 3 of our 4 adult children and 2 grand children just returned from a 4 day Disney cruise and we're sure that they were the ultimate best providers of services until now. YOU ARE THE BEST hands down and I greatly appreciate all you do to provide that high of service standard. Thank you and Serena very much for your help and assistance!!!!!!!
1.0
5

CFR Code

Tennessee Chill Box, LLC

Type “A” Supplied-air respirators, Grade “D” Breathable Air Only

Code of Federal Regulations (CFR)

The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) is the codification of the general and permanent rules and regulations (sometimes called administrative law) published in the Federal Register by the executive departments and agencies of the federal government of the United States.

CFRTitle 42Chapter ISubchapter GPart 84Subpart J › Section 84.130

42 CFR 84.130 – Supplied-air respirators; description.

§ 84.130 Supplied-air respirators; description.

Supplied-air respirators, including all completely assembled respirators designed for use as respiratory protection during entry into and escape from atmospheres not immediately dangerous to life or health are described as follows:

(a) Type “A” supplied-air respirators. A hose mask respirator, for entry into and escape from atmospheres not immediately dangerous to life or health, which consists of a motor-driven or hand-operated blower that permits the free entrance of air when the blower is not operating, a strong large-diameter hose having a low resistance to airflow, a harness to which the hose and the life-line are attached and a tight-fitting face piece.

(b) Type “AE” supplied-air respirators. A Type “A” supplied-air respirator equipped with additional devices designed to protect the wearer’s head and neck against impact and abrasion from rebounding abrasive material, and with shielding material such as plastic, glass, woven wire, sheet metal, or other suitable material to protect the window(s) of face pieces, hoods, and helmets which do not unduly interfere with the wearer’s vision and permit easy access to the external surface of such window(s) for cleaning.

(c) Type “B” supplied-air respirators. A hose mask respirator, for entry into and escape from atmospheres not immediately dangerous to life or health, which consists of a strong large-diameter hose with low resistance to airflow through which the user draws inspired air by means of his lungs alone, a harness to which the hose is attached, and a tight-fitting facepiece.

(d) Type “BE” supplied-air respirators. A type “B” supplied-air respirator equipped with additional devices designed to protect the wearer’s head and neck against impact and abrasion from rebounding abrasive material, and with shielding material such as plastic, glass, woven wire, sheet metal, or other suitable material to protect the window(s) of face pieces, hoods, and helmets which do not unduly interfere with the wearer’s vision and permit easy access to the external surface of such window(s) for cleaning.

(e) Type “C” supplied-air respirators. An airline respirator, for entry into and escape from atmospheres not immediately dangerous to life or health, which consists of a source of respirable breathing air, a hose, a detachable coupling, a control valve, orifice, a demand valve or pressure demand valve, an arrangement for attaching the hose to the wearer, and a face piece, hood, or helmet.

(f) Type “CE” supplied-air respirators. A type “C” supplied-air respirator equipped with additional devices designed to protect the wearer’s head and neck against impact and abrasion from rebounding abrasive material, and with shielding material such as plastic, glass, woven wire, sheet metal, or other suitable material to protect the window(s) of face pieces, hoods, and helmets which do not unduly interfere with the wearer’s vision and permit easy access to the external surface of such window(s) for cleaning.

CFRTitle 42Chapter ISubchapter GPart 84Subpart J › Section 84.131

42 CFR 84.131 – Supplied-air respirators; required components.

§ 84.131 Supplied-air respirators; required components.

(a) Each supplied-air respirator described in § 84.130 shall, where its design requires, contain the following component parts:

(1) Face piece, hood, or helmet;

(2) Air supply valve, orifice, or demand or pressure-demand regulator;

(3) Hand operated or motor driven air blower;

(4) Air supply hose;

(5) Detachable couplings;

(6) Flexible breathing tube; and

(7) Respirator harness.

(b) The component parts of each supplied-air respirator shall meet the minimum construction requirements set forth in subpart G of this part.

CFRTitle 42Chapter ISubchapter GPart 84Subpart J › Section 84.132

42 CFR 84.132 – Breathing tubes; minimum requirements.

§ 84.132 Breathing tubes; minimum requirements.

Flexible breathing tubes used in conjunction with supplied-air respirators shall be designed and constructed to prevent:

(a) Restriction of free head movement;

(b) Disturbance of the fit of face pieces, mouthpieces, hoods, or helmets;

(c) Interference with the wearer’s activities; and

(d) Shutoff of airflow due to kinking, or from chin or arm pressure.

CFRTitle 42Chapter ISubchapter GPart 84Subpart J › Section 84.133

42 CFR 84.133 – Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

§ 84.133 Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

(a) Each supplied-air respirator shall, where necessary, be equipped with a suitable harness designed and constructed to hold the components of the respirator in position against the wearer’s body.

(b) Harnesses shall be designed and constructed to permit easy removal and replacement of respirator parts, and where applicable, provide for holding a full face piece in the ready position when not in use.

CFRTitle 42Chapter ISubchapter GPart 84Subpart J › Section 84.134

42 CFR 84.134 – Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

§ 84.134 Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

Supplied-air respirators shall be equipped with a substantial, durable container bearing markings which show the applicant’s name, the type and commercial designation of the respirator it contains, and all appropriate approval labels.

CFRTitle 42Chapter ISubchapter GPart 84Subpart J › Section 84.135

42 CFR 84.135 – Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements.

§ 84.135 Half-mask face pieces, full face pieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements.

(a) Half-mask face pieces and full face pieces shall be designed and constructed to fit persons with various facial shapes and sizes either:

(1) By providing more than one face piece size; or

(2) By providing one face piece size which will fit varying facial shapes and sizes.

(b) Full face pieces shall provide for optional use of corrective spectacles or lenses, which shall not reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the respirator.

(c) Hoods and helmets shall be designed and constructed to fit persons with various head sizes, provide for the optional use of corrective spectacles or lenses, and insure against any restriction of movement by the wearer.

(d) Face pieces, hoods, and helmets shall be designed to prevent eyepiece fogging.

CFRTitle 42Chapter ISubchapter GPart 84Subpart J › Section 84.136

42 CFR 84.136 – Facepieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum requirements.

§ 84.136 Face pieces, hoods, and helmets; eyepieces; minimum requirements.

(a) Face pieces, hoods, and helmets shall be designed and constructed to provide adequate vision which is not distorted by the eyepiece.

(b) All eyepieces except those on Types B, BE, C, and CE supplied-air respirators shall be designed and constructed to be impact and penetration resistant. Federal Specification, Mask, Air Line: and Respirator, Air Filtering, Industrial, GGG-M-125d, October 11, 1965 with interim amendment-1, July 30, 1969, is an example of an appropriate standard for determining impact and penetration resistance. Copies of GGG-M-125d may be obtained from the NIOSH, Certification and Quality Assurance Branch, 1095 Willowdale Road, Morgantown, WV 26505-2888.

(c)

(1) The eyepieces of AE, BE, and CE type supplied-air respirators shall be shielded by plastic, glass, woven wire, sheet metal, or other suitable material which does not interfere with the vision of the wearer.

(2) Shields shall be mounted and attached to the face piece to provide easy access to the external surface of the eyepiece for cleaning.

CFRTitle 42Chapter ISubchapter GPart 84Subpart J › Section 84.137

42 CFR 84.137 – Inhalation and exhalation valves; check valves; minimum requirements.

§ 84.137 Inhalation and exhalation valves; check valves; minimum requirements.

(a) Inhalation and exhalation valves shall be provided where necessary and protected against distortion.

(b) Exhalation valves shall be:

(1) Protected against damage and external influence; and

(2) Designed and constructed to prevent inward leakage of contaminated air.

(c) Check valves designed and constructed to allow airflow toward the face piece only shall be provided in the connections to the face piece or in the hose fitting near the face piece of all Type A, AE, B, and BE supplied-air respirators.

CFRTitle 42Chapter ISubchapter GPart 84Subpart J › Section 84.138

42 CFR 84.138 – Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

§ 84.138 Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

Face pieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses which are designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use, and an even distribution of pressure over the entire area in contact with the face.

CFRTitle 42Chapter ISubchapter GPart 84Subpart J › Section 84.139

42 CFR 84.139 – Head and neck protection; supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

§ 84.139 Head and neck protection; supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

Type AE, BE, and CE supplied-air respirators shall be designed and constructed to provide protection against impact and abrasion from rebounding abrasive materials to the wearer’s head and neck.

CFRTitle 42Chapter ISubchapter GPart 84Subpart J › Section 84.140

42 CFR 84.140 – Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

§ 84.140 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or helmet at maximum airflow obtainable within pressure and hose length requirements and shall not exceed 80 dBA.

CFRTitle 42Chapter ISubchapter GPart 84Subpart J › Section 84.141

42 CFR 84.141 – Breathing gas; minimum requirements.

§ 84.141 Breathing gas; minimum requirements.

(a) Breathing gas used to supply supplied-air respirators shall be respirable breathing air and contain no less than 19.5 volume-percent of oxygen.

(b) Compressed, gaseous breathing air shall meet the applicable minimum grade requirements for Type I gaseous air set forth in the Compressed Gas Association Commodity Specification for Air, G-7.1, 1966 (Grade D or higher quality). G-7.1 is incorporated by reference and has been approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from American National Standards Institute, Inc., 1430 Broadway, New York, NY 10018. Copies may be inspected at the NIOSH, Certification and Quality Assurance Branch, 1095 Willowdale Road, Morgantown, WV 26505-2888, or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html.

(c) Compressed, liquefied breathing air shall meet the applicable minimum grade requirements for Type II liquid air set forth in the Compressed Gas Association Commodity Specification for Air, G-7.1, 1966 (Grade B or higher quality). G-7.1 is incorporated by reference and has been approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from American National Standards Institute, Inc., 1430 Broadway, New York, NY 10018. Copies may be inspected at the NIOSH, Certification and Quality Assurance Branch, 1095 Willowdale Road, Morgantown, WV 26505-2888, or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html.

CFRTitle 42Chapter ISubchapter GPart 84Subpart J › Section 84.142

42 CFR 84.142 – Air supply source; hand-operated or motor driven air blowers; Type A supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

§ 84.142 Air supply source; hand-operated or motor driven air blowers; Type A supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

(a) Blowers shall be designed and constructed to deliver an adequate amount of air to the wearer with either direction of rotation, unless constructed to permit rotation in one direction only, and to permit the free entrance of air to the hose when the blower is not operated.

(b) No multiple systems, whereby more than one user is supplied by one blower, will be approved, unless each hose line is connected directly to a manifold at the blower.

CFRTitle 42Chapter ISubchapter GPart 84Subpart J › Section 84.151

42 CFR 84.151 – Harness test; minimum requirements.

§ 84.151 Harness test; minimum requirements.

(a)

(1) Shoulder straps employed on Type A supplied-air respirators shall be tested for strength of material, joints, and seams and must separately withstand a pull of 113 kg. (250 pounds) for 30 minutes without failure.

(2) Belts, rings, and attachments for life lines must withstand a pull of 136 kg. (300 pounds) for 30 minutes without failure.

(3) The hose shall be firmly attached to the harness so as to withstand a pull of 113 kg. (250 pounds) for 30 minutes without separating, and the hose attachments shall be arranged so that the pull or drag of the hose behind an advancing wearer does not disarrange the harness or exert pull upon the face piece.

(4) The arrangement and suitability of all harness accessories and fittings will be considered.

(b)

(1) The harness employed on Type B supplied-air respirators shall not be uncomfortable, disturbing, or interfere with the movements of the wearer.

(2) The harness shall be easily adjustable to various sizes.

(3) The hose shall be attached to the harness in a manner that will withstand a pull of 45 kg. (100 pounds) for 30 minutes without separating or showing signs of failure.

(4) The design of the harness and attachment of the line shall permit dragging the maximum length of hose considered for approval over a concrete floor without disarranging the harness or exerting a pull on the face piece.

(5) The arrangement and suitability of all harness accessories and fittings will be considered.

(c) The harness employed on Type C respirators shall be similar to that required on the Type B respirator, or, it may consist of a simple arrangement for attaching the hose to a part of the wearer’s clothing in a practical manner that prevents a pull equivalent to dragging the maximum length of the hose over a concrete floor from exerting pull upon the respiratory-inlet covering.

(d) Where supplied-air respirators have a rigid or partly rigid head covering, a suitable harness shall be required to assist in holding this covering in place.

CFRTitle 42Chapter ISubchapter GPart 84Subpart J › Section 84.152

42 CFR 84.152 – Breathing tube test; minimum requirements.

§ 84.152 Breathing tube test; minimum requirements.

(a)

(1) Type A and Type B supplied-air respirators shall employ one or two flexible breathing tubes of the nonkinking type which extend from the face piece to a connecting hose coupling attached to the belt or harness.

(2) The breathing tubes employed shall permit free head movement, insure against closing off by kinking or by chin or arm pressure, and they shall not create a pull that will loosen the face piece or disturb the wearer.

(b) Breathing tubes employed on Type C supplied-air respirators of the continuous flow class shall meet the minimum requirements set forth in paragraph (a) of this section, however, an extension of the connecting hose may be employed in lieu of the breathing tubes required.

(c)

(1) A flexible, no kinking type breathing tube shall:

(i) Be employed on Type C supplied-air respirators of the demand and pressure-demand class; and

(ii) Extend from the face piece to the demand or pressure-demand valve, except where the valve is attached directly to the face piece.

(2) The breathing tube shall permit free head movement, insure against closing off by kinking or by chin or arm pressure, and shall not create a pull that will loosen the face piece or disturb the wearer.